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All the recent exoplanet discoveries have led to a renewed focus on theoretical planet formation models.

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Two primary mechanisms exist for predicting how gas giant planets form from the rotating disk of gas and dust that surrounds a young star—bottom-up, called core accretion, and top-down, called disk instability. The former refers to slowly building a planet through the collisions of increasingly larger material—solid dust grains, pebbles, boulders, and eventually planetesimals.

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Four Types of Stars That Will Not Exist for Billions or Even Trillions of Years

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Pixel tags may also be used to deliver cookies. Similar speculations arose in , when citizen scientists discovered a Kepler star with odd patterns and notified astronomer Tabetha Boyajian at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge.

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The light dips in that case looked intriguing enough that astrophysicist Jason Wright of Pennsylvania State University organized a campaign to listen to the object, eventually nicknamed Tabby's star, for leaking radio transmissions. The undertaking ultimately turned up nothing unusual. The possibility crossed his mind, he adds, as the seemingly-random dips reminded him of the scene in the film Contact in which Jodie Foster's character begins hearing blips from outer space that trace out a prime number sequence. The newly noticed star will certainly be added to the list of those investigated for signs of technological activity, Wright says.

But he considers it more likely astronomers will eventually settle on an explanation that does not involve intelligent extraterrestrials.

Four Types of Stars That Will Not Exist for Billions or Even Trillions of Years

Boyajian agrees. Yet few other observatories can match Kepler's extreme precision. Most ground-based telescopes are not sensitive enough to see the involved light dips, and it is difficult for researchers to reserve the relatively long stretches of time they would require on a powerful orbiting instrument such as the Hubble Space Telescope. Vanderburg says he and his colleagues are hoping someone in the astronomy community will think of something they have not. In the meantime, the situation remains another example of the universe's never-ending diversity. Adam Mann is a journalist specializing in astronomy and physics.

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